Approach temperament, anger, and evaluation: Resolving a paradox.

Abstract Factor analytic investigations into the structure of naturalistically observed self-reported mood suggest that anger loads together with avoidance temperament markers, such as fear and anxiety. However, when anger is examined following experimental manipulation, it appears to relate more to approach temperament markers, such as determined and active. We explored 1 potential reason why there is a discrepancy between naturalistically collected self-reported mood versus experimental manipulation of affect with regard to the location of anger in the mood space. We propose that evaluation—endorsing items of similar valence regardless of their semantic content—confounds the self-reported structure of mood. The evaluative dimension of self-reported mood does not appear to represent actual behavior, because it combines items with contradictory semantic content as long as they have similar valence. For example, someone with a positive self-view may endorse both calm and excited while denying sluggish and manic, and so forth, even though these items describe opposite traits. Isolating evaluation across 4 inventories and samples showed that anger clustered together with approach temperament markers. We conclude that isolating evaluation generates a self-reported structure of mood that aligns more closely with experimental investigations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved)

KEYWORDS

SHARE & LIKE

COMMENTS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

实验社会心理学的研究进展

0 Following 12 Fans 0 Projects 34 Articles

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Abstract This contribution offers a review, comprehensive to date, of a 15-year research program on the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions.

Read More

Abstract This contribution offers a review, comprehensive to date, of a 15-year research program on the broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions.

Read More

Abstract Where does morality come from? Why are moral judgments often so similar across cultures, yet sometimes so variable? Is morality one thing, or

Read More

Abstract Where does morality come from? Why are moral judgments often so similar across cultures, yet sometimes so variable? Is morality one thing, or

Read More

Abstract A growing body of literature has documented cultural differences in cognitive processes and also proposed various factors underlying these cu

Read More

Abstract A growing body of literature has documented cultural differences in cognitive processes and also proposed various factors underlying these cu

Read More

Abstract When a person encounters a persuasive appeal, a salient perception of the message is often the extent to which it is relatively proattitudina

Read More

Abstract When a person encounters a persuasive appeal, a salient perception of the message is often the extent to which it is relatively proattitudina

Read More

Abstract In this chapter, I review my program of research on implicit attitudes and beliefs. These attitudes and beliefs are often acquired without in

Read More

Abstract In this chapter, I review my program of research on implicit attitudes and beliefs. These attitudes and beliefs are often acquired without in

Read More