University of California Davis2014-09-30 11:05 PM

Breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop distinct gut microbiotas and immune systems

Abstract


Diet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization is required for normal development of the immune system and that specific microbial constituents prompt the differentiation or expansion of certain immune cell subsets. Nonetheless, it has been unclear how profoundly diet might shape the primate immune system or how durable the influence might be. We show that breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop markedly different immune systems, which remain different 6 months after weaning when the animals begin receiving identical diets. In particular, breast-fed infants develop robust populations of memory T cells as well as T helper 17 (TH17) cells within the memory pool, whereas bottle-fed infants do not. These findings may partly explain the variation in human susceptibility to conditions with an immune basis, as well as the variable protection against certain infectious diseases.


Full Article

KEYWORDS

SHARE & LIKE

COMMENTS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

University of California Davis

0 Following 0 Fans 0 Projects 7 Articles

SIMILAR ARTICLES

AbstractObjectiveTo determine whether state-mandated minimum nurse-to-patient staffing ratios in California hospitals had an effect on reported occupat

Read More

AbstractBluetongue virus (BTV) is the cause of an economically important arboviral disease of domestic and wild ruminants. The occurrence of BTV infect

Read More

AbstractDiet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization i

Read More

SignificanceUnlike germplasm banks, on-farm conservation allows crops to evolve continuously in response to changing conditions. Agricultural adaptatio

Read More

Abstracttalpid2 is an avian autosomal recessive mutant with a myriad of congenital malformations, including polydactyly and facial clefting. Although p

Read More